Sunday, June 29, 2014

Collaboration between companies + school district = Connected educators

Are you gaga over Google? Do you think Microsoft is magnificent? Do you excel at using Edmodo? Do you think PBS is the perfect platform for digital media content?

Wouldn’t it be great to find others in your district using the same tools as you? Wouldn’t it be great to have a direct connection to the people who work at the companies of the very resources you are using for teaching and learning? 

As reported this week in the Wall Street Journal, Chalkbeat New York, and this press release from the NYC Department of Education's press office, this has become a reality for NYC Department of Education teachers.  


As part of Chancellor Carmen Farina’s commitment to integrate more technology into classrooms a series of innovative summer courses for teachers will be offered so that teachers are equipped to ensure students graduate from New York City public schools with the digital skills they need to succeed.


Saturday, June 28, 2014

The hottest posts everyone's reading

Here’s the roundup of what's been popular on The Innovative Educator blog. Below you’ll see the top posts along with the number of page views. I hope there's something that looks of interest to you.  If it does, check it out. If you’re inspired use one of those icons below the post to share it with others and/or leave a comment.
Entry
Pageviews
Jun 22, 2014, 
3962
Jun 1, 2014, 
3431
May 6, 2012, 
3093
Aug 24, 2010, 
2822
Jun 4, 2014, 
2388
Jun 13, 2013, 
1559
Jun 2, 2014, 
1482
Jun 18, 2014, 
1420
May 12, 2010, 
1316

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Teaching Gen Text authors explain why cell phones should go to school

My co-author Willyn Webb and I had the opportunity to speak with "Tech Page One - Insights from the Evolving World of Tech" to explain why cell phones should be allowed in the classroom.  You can read the entire piece at BYOD Goes to School, 

Here is what we said during our interview with the author of the article.  

Once considered a distraction, smartphones are now being used by teachers to expand teaching options


Lisa Nielsen, who blogs at The Innovative Educator and co-authored “Teaching Generation Text,” advocates for cellphone use in classrooms. She has taught students how to record podcasts, use Twitter and post photos to Flickr with their phones.

“My philosophy is that we should be preparing students for the real world, and it’s a world in which we rely on our cellphones constantly,” Nielsen says. “We can engage learners in really powerful ways that were never before possible.”

How cellphone capabilities are changing learning

Willyn Webb, co-author with Nielsen and a high school counselor and assistant principal in Colorado, says that when she started teaching only one video camera was available for her students. Now, thanks to smartphones, every student has the capability to take photos and video, and to stay in the loop when they are not in class.
Apps that Webb has used include Celly, which allows teachers to text students while not revealing phone numbers, and Poll Everywhere, which helps teachers conduct polls through text messages.

With their use of cellphones, students at Webb’s alternative high school are taking on more learning, even without being asked, she says. One time, during a brainstorming session, she took notes on the board and, instead of having students write down the information, she told them to snap a photo with their phones.

“Since they had the picture of the notes in their phones — and the phones are part of their real lives and real worlds — they made a decent amount of progress [at home],” Webb says. “It was a homework assignment I didn’t have to assign. It was part of the device they know, love and always have with them.”

Sunday, June 22, 2014

10 Ways Social Media Can Improve Writing in Your Classroom

Guest Post by Vicki Davis


Editor’s note:  Vicki Davis just wrote a new book called, Reinventing Writing. I asked her if she could contribute a post to The Innovative Educator explaining specifically how social media has reinvented writing. This is that post.  
As hall of fame baseball player, Babe Ruth said, “Yesterday’s home runs won’t win tomorrow’s games.” To level up writing, we need to take advantage of the out-of-the park features and capabilities that social media inspired concepts give writing instruction.

Most of us know how it feels to write an exciting Facebook status update or a powerful tweet. Without delay, we know the impact of our words as they are retweeted, commented on, and liked (or ignored.) With this in mind, it stands to reason that students want a response too. Paper essays that are only seen by the teacher with a wastebasket as their final destiny are a needless waste of time and potential. Writing can be so much more exciting and it isn’t that hard to do.

Notably, social media is impacting writing in the classroom in ten powerful ways. You don’t have to be on social media (or even like it)  to feel the lift social media concepts can give writing in your classroom, as I share in my new book  Reinventing Writing released just this month.

10 Ways Social Media Has Reinvented Writing and Tips to Benefit Students

Social Media Impact #1 - Connect with an Audience.

Research shows that audience improves student writing effort and work. It makes sense, writers want meaning.

Tip: Use methods like Quadblogging,  #comments4kids, or encouraging parents to comment and view student work to help promote audience of your students’ public work.

Saturday, June 21, 2014

The hottest posts everyone's reading

Here’s the roundup of what's been popular on The Innovative Educator blog. Below you’ll see the top posts along with the number of page views. I hope there's something that looks of interest to you.  If it does, check it out. If you’re inspired use one of those icons below the post to share it with others and/or leave a comment.

Entry
Pageviews
Jun 1, 2014, 
3341
May 6, 2012, 
2585
Jun 4, 2014, 
2284
May 12, 2010, 
2159
May 18, 2014, 
1738

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

5 Reasons to Consider an Accelerated Degree Program


While the idea of spending four fabulous years of freedom to be on your own immersed in study, is certainly appealing, there are a number of reasons why the traditional college experience might not work for students. Today's students are less naive about student loans understanding that the reality, is most of us can’t afford to wrack up tens of thousands of dollars in loans before entering the workforce.

As a result, more and more, people are looking at alternatives like starting college in high school with programs like College Now, testing out of classes, or taking accelerated degree programs. Such programs are a potential solution for individuals who don’t have the luxury of spending several years out of the workforce.  I’ve shared several posts on the first two options.  Accelerated degree programs deserve a closer look.  
Here are five reasons why accelerated degree programs might be the right option for your students.

Sunday, June 15, 2014

10 Tips to help educators break into paid gigs

Cross posted at Smartblogs for Education
Have you ever been inspired by a great conference keynote speech?  A workshop presenter that your school or district hired?  Do you want to share your ideas, be useful to others, and make some extra money?. Have you ever wondered how that could be you some day?

Well, it can, but it takes time to position yourself to take your show on the road. Below are some suggestions taken from what I’ve seen work for successful speakers and professional development providers.


1 - Know what you want to be known for
Pick your focus. There should be just be one or two things you are known for as the go-to person.  This should guide your identity in all your profiles/bios and there should be keywords that you use that become tied to who you are and what you stand for. 

2 - Engage on Twitter
Find other people doing your work and who are the audience that would invite you to speak.  Know popular hashtags and chats. There is a big community of education thinkers and doers out there who might help you brainstorm. Put the topics you are passionate about in your bio using the hashtags you care about most.  This way when someone searches a hashtag, they’ll find you. For example, if #BYOD (bring your own device) ) is your thing, use that in your bio.  People can find you when they search for those knowledgeable in your area. You can see what that looks like here.

Saturday, June 14, 2014

The hottest posts everyone's reading

Here’s the roundup of what's been popular on The Innovative Educator blog. Below you’ll see the top posts along with the number of page views. I hope there's something that looks of interest to you.  If it does, check it out. If you’re inspired use one of those icons below the post to share it with others and/or leave a comment.

Entry
Pageviews
Jun 1, 2014,
3315
May 6, 2012,
2561
Jun 4, 2014,
2256
May 12, 2010,
2242
May 14, 2010,
1759
May 18, 2014,
1741
Jun 2, 2014,
1460
Jun 13, 2013,
1322

Sunday, June 8, 2014

16 Conference picks for innovative educators in the upcoming school year

The Innovative Educator in the Social Media Booth at NYSCATE 13




As the 13/14 school year comes to a close, it's time to think about what events and conferences to attend for the next year.  While I certainly won't be attending all these conferences below are my top picks listed in chronological order. They include a link to the conference, brief description, approximate dates (if they are not yet scheduled) based on previous years and non-member, full costs (some are estimates based on previous years) which include pre-conference fees. 

Take a look.  See what you think and share which conferences you are attending and why you made that choice.

Saturday, June 7, 2014

The hottest posts everyone's reading

Here’s the roundup of what's been popular on The Innovative Educator blog. Below you’ll see the top posts along with the number of page views. I hope there's something that looks of interest to you.  If it does, check it out. If you’re inspired use one of those icons below the post to share it with others and/or leave a comment.

Wednesday, June 4, 2014

Social Media Guidelines for Students and Teachers by Students and Teachers

As I shared earlier this year the New York City Department of Education (NYC DOE) created social media guidelines for students 13+ with students, teachers, and parents.  Students said they wanted to see the guidelines as infographics.  Teachers and parents wanted guides.

So...

The NYC DOE gathered together students, teachers, and parents to create what they requested. Now they are available, at no cost, not just for students, staff, and families in New York City, but they are also available for anyone ready to embrace social media to support college, career, and citizenship success.

You can see all the materials on the website at schools.nyc.gov/socialmedia. You can visit the Parent Guide here, the Teacher Guide here, and the infographics below.
Link for Definition of Social Media Infographic
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...